The Masterharper of Pern: What Is The Sound Of One Man Snapping?

Last chapters, Robinton got a son, who is special needs, and an apprentice, who is incredibly talented and can soak up things like a sponge.

Fax engineered F’lon’s death, and the worst that happened to him is that his travel visa was immediately revoked, instead of his life.

The Masterharper of Pern: Chapters XVIII and XIX: Content Notes: “Mercy” infanticide ideation, fat-shaming, abuse,

This chapter opens with what should have been going on all the time – Nip reports, on his travels, that mysterious acts of sabotage are plaguing Fax’s territories. Timber burnt, grain blighted, mines collapsed, fishing ships disappear, rebellions in the provinces which are put down brutally, but otherwise nothing that overthrows Fax, but does keep his energy focused on trying to keep his territory together.

Terathel dies, Larad is confirmed, and there’s a problem in the account of such things.

There was a brief flurry when Larad’s elder half-sister, Thella, insisted that the Conclave had to hear her right to the Holding. Lord Tesner of Igen, the most senior of the Holders, was outraged at her impudence and refused her admittance. The other Lord Holders and Masters were only too happy to second his motion. Robinton looked for her during the following reception, wanting to see a woman who was brave enough to speak up as eldest in the Bloodline by there was no sign of her. He often wondered what happened to her because she disappeared from Telgar Hold shortly afterward.

I’m mostly calling bullshit on the idea that Robinton wanted to meet the brave girl, since he’s not doing too great on the bit where girls are flocking to the Hall. And the narrative makes no note of his vote on the proposal to reject Thella. The narrative is covering your ass, Robinton.

And tries to do so big time when this gem appears.

Robinton wished he had more contact with [F’lon’s sons], and not only because they were F’lon’s lads. He could have wished for one of them as his. He had once wished that Camo wouldn’t survive his first Turn, as so often happened to babies.

Cocowhat by depizan

Cocowhat by depizan

You are a terrible person, Robinton. And your attitude is still far too common among parents of disabled children, or children on the autism spectrum, and even here in 21st century Terra, we have people praising infanticide as a way of relieving the poor suffering parent of their burdensome child.

Furthermore, what’s happened to the state of medicine if we’ve gone from “we can perform an appendectomy on you” to a clearly high infant mortality rate. Midwifery and obstetric care can’t have taken that big a nosedive in this shirt time period, right?

Nip arrives, reports Fax is up to something, belatedly realizes what, and both he and Robinton ride to Ruatha to try and prevent the tragedy we already know has happened. Nip and Robinton realize they’re too late, and ride immediately to Fort to sound the alarm. The Lords ride in to demand Fax knock it off, and Fax calls them out to invade him, if they want him gone that bad, and threatens them that he’ll kill them all for trespass on his territory if they don’t get out by nightfall. The Lords leave, and then set to arguing about what they could have or should have done to get Fax to listen. Robinton splits off from that group, because he’s pissed and has no intention of listening to recriminations and what-ifs.

And yet, they apparently can’t unite enough right now, in their rage, to raise a force to surround Fax and then meticulously invade him from all sides and grind him into dust? They’ve had every pretext and justification in front of them. They’ve just seen slaughter and invasion. They have every right under the Charter to blockade, starve, and crush Fax. Why aren’t they?

Because the plot says we have to wait, or the continuity won’t line up. Some good the Charter has done, having been so meticulously retroactively applied to that continuity. It made much more sense when the Charter was lost to everyone.

The rest of the chapter is essentially Nip telling Robinton it was a bad idea to do the thing. Chapter XIX opens up with real progress on the matter: The Crafts, mostly silent to this point, say “get forked, Fax” and pull out as many of their personnel as they can and refuse, in the face of bribes and lucrative incentives, to go back to those spaces. The Healers are the only ones who don’t, Oldive says it’s a matter of principles, and nobody gives him or the Healers grief over it.

Then there’s a training montage, of sorts, that plays out over five Turns while Robinton (and everyone else, apparently,) waits for instability to topple Fax from the inside. Sebell turns out to be ferocious at physical exercises and a quick hand and mind in helping everyone else out, gathering his journeyman rank, and being sorely missed by Robinton on his year abroad at Igen. Sebell also suggests that Trailer, an excellent drummer with a penchant for shirking work and playing pranks, might be best apprenticed to Nip. Which is a smash, and Trailer becomes Tuck, Nip’s shadow and oh my gods the puns are terrible.

As much as Sebell is essentially young Robinton, Tuck is young Nip and delivers the news that someone is seriously sabotaging Ruatha, who is on their fourth (fifth?) steward without any ability to turn a profit.

“Hmm. That’s interesting. A kind of subtle rebellion?”
Tuck gave the sort of snort that Nip affected. “With that bunch of drudges? They’re the most useless incompetents I’ve seen. And since I’ve been north–” He gestured with a thumb. “–I’ve seen every sort of way to avoid hard work that’s been invented. And then some. The only jobs that get done in a halfway decent fashion are helped along by an overseer with a whip standing over the workers. Fax has only so many men and too many holdings.” He grinned broadly. “Though his supply of metal-knotted whips seems inexhaustible.”
[…]
“What could be happening there?” Robinton asked, more or less rhetorically. “If there is no one able to foment trouble, is it trouble, or pure carelessness on the stewards’ parts?”

The answer, I suspect, lies with Auric Goldfinger.

Once is happenstance. Twice is coincidence. Three times is enemy action.

Ruatha is on four or five here, and should be getting intense scrutiny from Fax as to why it can’t seem to do anything right. That should be opening up other opportunities for the outside forces to chip in and harry Fax and make him spread his resources dangerously thin. If the forces arrayed against Fax are interested in doing so, they could spark rebellion against him. But again, for plot reasons, nobody is doing anything, and it doesn’t make any sense. Even one Weyr of dragons would be enough to obliterate Fax many times over. Admittedly, that ruins their non-interference policy, but we’ve all forgotten Chalkin at this point, and I don’t think the dragons would suffer too much bad press for making Fax disappear.

And because the narrative still can’t let go of it, even in death, Jora is shamed.

Robinton had had the details from a letter sent to Master Oldive by Lord Raid’s journeyman healer, who had been brought by R’gul to try to keep the weyrwoman alive. Remembering how Jora had gorged herself at the Impression Feast–and that had been Turns ago now–he had no trouble believing that the woman had died of overeating. The healer had been appalled at the state she was in and had agreed that she should be interred between.

Cocowhat by depizan

Oh, wow. So now we get to the point where Jora is apparently so grotesque that even in death everyone agrees she should be dropped off in hyperspace rather than being buried in ground (as, presumably, the rest of everyone is). And “overeating” is not a cause of death. Choking is. Heart attack is. Suffocation is. Any one of a number of complications that can happen to someone is. But “overeating” is not a cause of death.

Furthermore, nobody seems to have given a tunnel snake’s ass about why someone might feed themselves that significantly. We already know Jora was violently afraid of heights. (And that Pern has no psychiatrists or psychologists.) Did having bulk help her feel more connected to the ground?

Did Jora have a condition that made her feel perpetually hungry, or one that made making fat way easier than burning it? What kind of food insecurity did Jora experience, and how much of that might be driving her choices regarding food and the way her body stored energy? The healers of a far future, pseudo-Latin Christendom society sound far too suspiciously like the medics of our own time, both in being willing to chalk up any malady to Death Fat and in refusing to consider any other course of action other than “have you considered losing weight?” as viable. The narrative said Jora was fat at the beginning of the series as well, but it’s added an extra degree of fat-shaming in the interim.

Before the narrative dwells too much on this, a runner arrives with a message for Robinton to “do a Nip and Tuck” and make for Ruatha, because Fax and dragonriders are on a forced march there. Silvina and Sebell object to Robinton going, although Silvina eventually helps him perfect his drudge disguise.

So Robinton disguises himself and gets inside as a drudge to help clean the place up before Fax gets there, then gets sent down to take care of Fax’s animals. And there’s a moment that would be good character development if it weren’t such a non-apology.

Although he knew very well that the drudges in the Harper Hall and Fort Hold were well cared for, he discovered a heretofore unexpected sympathy for those whom life had deprived of the wit or energy to achieve more than such lowly positions.

Because unless you’re visibly disabled, it can’t be the machinations of a system designed to make most people subsistence farmers and essential house slaves as to why you’re a drudge. You must be too lazy to apply yourself to better things.

Robinton eventually manages to trade himself up to guard thanks to a clothes change and therefore get himself in the room where it happens. I’m glossing over the fact that all the drudges and soldiers have rough speech phonetically rendered so as to make them bumpkins rather than the smooth-spoken Harpers and Lords. So we get to see the same scene from the beginning of the series from the perspective of Robinton, with the exception that apparently Robinton can feel ripples of power in the room (remember, the series started with the idea that Lessa had some amount of psi power and was using it), but knows it isn’t the dragons or their riders that are the source of it. And a few other touches.

“Oh, dead, dead, poor Gemma. Oh, Lord Fax, we did all we could, but the journey…” She ran to where Fax was sitting.
Casually Fax slapped her and she fell sobbing in a heap at his feet.
Robinton saw [the eventual Benden Weyrleader] reach for his dagger hilt. Women in the Weyr were rarely treated in such a harsh manner. It would definitely go against a dragonrider’s grain.

Excuse me while I laugh at this idea, given how the Benden Weyrleader will treat Lessa. Robinton should be more concerned that the son will die in the same way as the father. But that is not mentioned, and the scene continues, with Robinton noting the drudge (Lessa) is much less drudgey than she was when she left, before Fax punches her out and then gets into the fight with the Benden Weyrleader. At the utterance of the “dragonwomen” sneer, Robinton makes the comparison, noting that the son has his temper much better in hand than the father did.

Fight, death, et cetera. The younger of the two sons asks if anyone else wants to contest the outcome, and then Robinton finally gets a “second good look” at Lessa and recognizes who she is supposed to be. He also immediately tags her as the source of the strange behavior and waves of power, because she’s a full Ruatha-blooded woman, and the narrative really hopes we haven’t been fans since the beginning, so that we don’t notice the tinkering to get the old to rejoin the new.

Nip frightens Robinton by appearing, and then Robinton users his position and the friendly dragonriders to convince Fax’s remaining soldiers to head back without further issues. They set to getting rid of the body, getting Jaxom a nurse, and getting word out for successors to go in and claim their holds back. And the book ends with the watch-wher trying to protect Lessa and her disappearance to Benden.

The acknowledgements right after, on the other hand, rather than being a retread of narrative, are quite fascinating.

As usual, I am indebted to a variety of people for their help and input in writing this volume, not the least of whom is Master Robinton (aka Frederic H. Robinson), who was quite upset that I had ended his life so abruptly. I would suspect it of a tenor, but for a baritone to insist on another encore is almost unheard of. But I have recently been asked–via the impressive Del Rey Web site–to explain certain facts that had not previously been brought to light about Pern pre-Dragonflight history. As Robinton had a fine Pernese hand in most of it, it behooves me to tell the story from his viewpoint.
[…]
This time, my gratitude to Marilyn and Harry Alm as first readers is immense since they saved me from several time discrepancies and inconsistencies. Their knowledge of Pern is extensive and better remembered than mine at times.

And there’s also many thanks to the musical helpers.

But that acknowledgement pretty well admits this book is Retcon: the Novel for Pern. And why it has such a hagiographic viewpoint toward Robinton and wanted to remake him into a much better person than he is.

I chuckle slightly at the comment about avoiding discrepancies and paradoxes, given that this is what the series book and the continuity editor is for, but also that the entire published canon is still being published, and so one could theoretically look things up as needed. But also a bit because having timeline readers when you are trying to rework the timeline entirely strikes me as the person who fixes the obvious holes and then leaves the things that are going to become holes soon enough as “repeat business.”

And so, we put another novel in the books and instead turn our eyes to one of the short stories, “Runner of Pern,” which might shed some light on the network of communications that traverses the planet.

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14 thoughts on “The Masterharper of Pern: What Is The Sound Of One Man Snapping?

  1. saidahgilbert May 17, 2018 at 12:02 pm

    That last part with Lessa, I was cringing whole time. How could Robinton have been there all along? Surely Lessa would’ve noticed him since she had psi powers and was sabotaging things in the background. She must’ve kept a sharp lookout for anything or anybody who could disrupt her plans so how could Robinton get away with a simple “disguise”? After all, drudges are like a whole different species of people on Pern so Lessa, who was pretending to be one should’ve noticed somebody else who was also pretending to be a drudge.

  2. Wingsrising May 17, 2018 at 2:22 pm

    The time discrepancy with Sebell is also huge and irreconcilable. He’s an apprentice in Dragonquest and has just risen to journeyman in Dragonsinger, but here he’s been one for more than seven years.

    “Although he knew very well that the drudges in the Harper Hall and Fort Hold were well cared for…”

    See, this is just so twisted. We have issues with how we treat and pay people who do menial work in our society, too, but no one uses the language that our janitors and garbage men are “well cared for” as though they weren’t adults who could bloody well take care of themselves.

    Aside: given that dragons go between when their rider dies, I’d have thought that being buried between was standard for the Weyr, rather like Half Circle clearly buried people at sea. But apparently not. That’s saved for unattractive people.

  3. genesistrine May 17, 2018 at 4:25 pm

    @SilverAdept: infant mortality out of nowhere: yeah, I definitely want to know more about the death rate; “so often” is a *very* worrying phrase.

    As much as Sebell is essentially young Robinton, Tuck is young Nip

    Tuck is Piemur. He even has the “good treble lost at puberty” thing…. BTW, was Sebell related to Robinton in People of Pern too?

    If the forces arrayed against Fax are interested in doing so, they could spark rebellion against him.

    To be fair to Bargen, he does seem to be giving it his best, though with no apparent help or support from anyone including Robinton (and his author), and in spite of rude remarks from Robinton’s apprentice spy. (“Bargen’s so careful he’s womanish,” Tuck said with disgust. and mysteriously escapes getting the thick ear Piemur got for being rude about a Lord, not to mention that’s also an obnoxious remark because a) “womanish”, really? and b) at least he’s bloody *trying*.)

    R.I.P. Jora. Did having bulk help her feel more connected to the ground?

    Or make her feel safer because less likely to be lifted off it?

    it can’t be the machinations of a system designed to make most people subsistence farmers and essential house slaves as to why you’re a drudge. You must be too lazy to apply yourself to better things.

    Let’s not forget that Lessa was able to pass as a drudge as a small girl of (Robinton thinks) 9 or 10. Drudges aren’t just adults. THERE ARE CHILD DRUDGES.

    Acknowledgements: holy god she had beta readers for “time discrepancies and inconsistencies” who *still* didn’t notice the mysterious appearance of the Charter? And quite a few other things, e.g.:

    @Wingsrising: The time discrepancy with Sebell

    And the time discrepancy with *Lessa*. Robinton think’s she’s 9 or 10 when Fax invades Ruatha, and this book has her being Searched *5 years later*.

    A less horrifying one is that Tarathel dies at the beginning of chapter 18 and Larad takes over, but when the Lords go to shout at Fax Tarathel is there and shouting with the rest. Sterling work there, beta readers!

    Oh, and:

    As Robinton had a fine Pernese hand in most of it,

    He did sod all! He sat and watched, and occasionally shed male tears. That is not “having a hand in it”.

  4. Wingsrising May 17, 2018 at 4:46 pm

    Re: Maternal and infant mortality. Those are generally high in the absence of modern medicine. (And Google suggests that the first appendectomy was performed in 1735, so that doesn’t necessarily mean modern medicine.)

    In particular, does pre-AIVAS Ninth Pass Pern still have vaccines? I can’t recall from All the Weyrs of Pern, etc. but I’ve always noted how the vaccine in Moreta has been changed to “all-important seeds that contained the cure” by the time of Dragonsinger.

  5. Brenda A May 17, 2018 at 5:38 pm

    It really isn’t that high of an expectation for an author to read their own previous work before trying to add to it after so much time.

    According to the very first book, Dragonflight, Lessa’s family was killed when she was eleven, and F’lar came to Ruatha ten years later. Which screws with Sebell’s timeline even more.

    It’s here at the end that I just keep rolling my eyes, because it turns into Forrest Gump on Pern. He was there at every important scene, we just never knew!

  6. MadamAtom May 17, 2018 at 7:25 pm

    “BTW, was Sebell related to Robinton in People of Pern too?”

    -checks- Nope, no mention.

    There *is* mention of his “dark” hair on the left page across from his clearly blond portrait on the right, which apparently bothered Miss Atom not at all since I’ve no memory of it. -rolls eyes at younger self- I guess I was the perfect Pern consumer, huh? 🙂

  7. Silver Adept May 17, 2018 at 7:27 pm

    @ saidahgilbert –

    Drudges are the untouchable class – and while the narrative insists that drudges aren’t smart (or necessarily even neurotypical – @ Wingrising, there’s always a strong implication that drudges are where the learning disabled ends up, although Camo might be one of the very few explicitly acknowledged as such. So the paternalistic attitude is pretty square for the appropriate period of Terran history Pern wants to emulate. It’s still terrible.) enough to notice, Lessa really should. And potentially be hostile to him, thinking he’s an agent of Fax that’s discovered her.

    @ genesistrine –

    Sod all, indeed.

    Bargen could be getting resupply and reinforcements from those who want Fax’s ouster and are willing to hire mercenaries to deliver the goods and fight with Bargen. Or, y’know, they could all just decide Fax has overreached, using whatever excuse is convenient, and invade him together. Fax should have already died at Terathel’s hands (or Nip’s, if he’s that good at flinging knives in crowded spaces), anyway.

    @ everyone –

    And oh, goodness, the time discrepancies. Unless there’s a yet-to-be-seen book in this series where it turns out the new timeline in Masterharper is real because a dragonrider went back and meddled with things, this book needed a lot more than just a few readers making sure the times lined up. It pretty clearly looks like a mess, and that’s before all of you can provide specific details of the messes in addition to what I’ve seen.

    And it’s never really clear about what parts of medicine have survived and what ones have not. It seems to be more of a case of Powers as the Plot Demands, rather than a thoughtful look at what the likely medical innovations and practices were for the time. And the correspondingly high death rates for mothers and children.

  8. WanderingUndine May 17, 2018 at 10:54 pm

    Reaction count for The Masterharper of Pern: 16 cocowhats, 7 “Surrounded by assholes,” 5 “Cat says F this,” 1 “Fuck you,” 1 “Anvil chorus,” and 1 “Homer shouts a bad word”

    That’s only one more cocowhat than Dragonseye got, but far more “Surrounded by assholes” and “Cat says F this” than any previous book.

    People can burn timber and damage boats, but how do they “blight” grain? Leave the storage facility door open to let rain in?

    I grimly suspect the ‘heroes’ don’t wonder why Jora chronically “overate” because they assumed it was a lack of the self-discipline that prevents all stronger-willed people from eating as much as they want. Sheer hedonistic self-indulgence, in other words. It’s likely to be one of the many reasons you suggest, but those don’t occur to them. Ugh

  9. Firedrake May 18, 2018 at 1:26 am

    @genesistrine:

    “Sterling work there, beta readers!”

    I’ve been a beta reader twice for works that were eventually published. Both times I pointed out significant flaws and possible ways of fixing them, and the author decided not to change them. I don’t do it any more.

    And by this point in her career Anne was selling enough to be able to override editorial decisions, never mind those of her friends.

    So while I have no insight into the creation of this particular book I think one can draw some plausible inferences.

  10. WanderingUndine May 18, 2018 at 11:15 pm

    Edit: I mean I suspect these guys blame Jora’s “overeating” on lack of the self-disipline they seem to *think* is the only thing preventing anyone from eating as much as they want, i.e. ‘too much.’ Combined with that, they consider her “lazy,” not doing whatever vigorous activity is seen to physically and morally ‘justify’ a big appetite in ‘fitter’ people. Thus, a hedonist. Argh.

  11. genesistrine May 19, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @Brenda A: It’s here at the end that I just keep rolling my eyes, because it turns into Forrest Gump on Pern. He was there at every important scene, we just never knew!

    Yeah, this kind of crap is why everyone trashtalks prequels. He was there but never actually did anything or influenced anyone.

    And it’s a pity, because there’s a solid concept there. The common complaint about prequels is that we know how they end up, which is true, but we don’t know how come they ended up that way. Robinton could still do things that steer Pern towards what we see in DF, or try and steer it to something better and fail – that could work nicely with his functional alcoholism. We could have had a character study of the Robinton we see in the early parts of this book; going up against bullies to protect a watchwher and getting beaten up; he could have kept that attitude as an adult.

    For example he could argue for Thella to get a hearing, add in some politicking, have him trying to sell it to the Lords as “if women can inherit we’ve got legitimate heirs to oust Fax”, pushing Lords he knows have competent daughters and useless sons, trying to get their wives on-side, pointing out that the Charter uses gender-neutral language… we know he’ll lose, but there’s no reason the Robinton we met at the beginning wouldn’t fight anyway.

    He could support Bargen’s rebellion; smarm the Lords and crafters into sending supplies, spread Rebel Songs (though I bet Pernese are very against supporting rebels of any stripe; that ALWAYS OBEY AUTHORITY thing again…)

    And along that line:

    “Hmm. That’s interesting. A kind of subtle rebellion?”

    Tuck gave the sort of snort that Nip affected. “With that bunch of drudges? They’re the most useless incompetents I’ve seen. And since I’ve been north–” He gestured with a thumb. “–I’ve seen every sort of way to avoid hard work that’s been invented. And then some. The only jobs that get done in a halfway decent fashion are helped along by an overseer with a whip standing over the workers. Fax has only so many men and too many holdings.”

    I missed this before, but I’m reminded of when the Voyage of the Dawn Treader read on Ana Mardoll’s blog got to Coriakin’s Island, and talked about slaves resisting by playing stupid and small-scale sabotage.

    @WanderingUndine: People can burn timber and damage boats, but how do they “blight” grain? Leave the storage facility door open to let rain in? Maybe save a few blighted grains from the last lot and chuck them in the silo as well? Biowarfare! And Robinton and other harpers could bring infected grain to rebel groups – there could be a whole Underground. Songs about the Pernese equivalent of the Wise Men of Gotham to give peasants and drudges ideas of how to play stupid? (Though that does have the problem that that could spread to the rest of Pern, and the Lords wouldn’t like that at ALL!)

    And what about Hold/Weyr politics – remember in DF that only 3 holds were still tithing to the Weyr. Was that a recent thing? Was it only under R’gul’s noninterference policy? What was the relationship between the Holds and Weyr before then? DF seems to hint pretty heavily that Fax only started collecting Holds one the Weyr went into seclusion, so write that! What did the Weyr do before when someone tried to take over 2 Holds? Show us!

  12. genesistrine May 19, 2018 at 3:19 am

    @Wingsrising: In particular, does pre-AIVAS Ninth Pass Pern still have vaccines?

    Even in Moreta’s time there doesn’t seem to be any regular program of preventive vaccination. They know the technique, but it only seems to be used when a particular disease flares up.

    It could be epidemic disease killing the newborns, but tht seems a bit unlikely as an ongoing problem. Maybe it’s poor nutrition (mother and baby)? (Shorter’s ‘History of Women’s Bodies’ has some horrible details on what childbirth can do to women who’ve been malnourished themselves). But without knowing comparative death rates in different social classes and environments we can’t really make a sensible guess.

    @MadamAtom: There *is* mention of his “dark” hair on the left page across from his clearly blond portrait on the right, which apparently bothered Miss Atom not at all since I’ve no memory of it. -rolls eyes at younger self- I guess I was the perfect Pern consumer, huh?

    😀

    @Firedrake: I think one can draw some plausible inferences.

    “my gratitude to Marilyn and Harry Alm as first readers is immense since they saved me from several time discrepancies and inconsistencies but I left those in anyway LOL”?

    @WanderingUndine: blame Jora’s “overeating” on lack of the self-disipline

    They almost seem to think she’s doing it deliberately out of spite. And who knows, maybe she *is*. “The only reason you want me to be thin is so that you’re not embarrassed to have sex with me if your damn dragon wins? Up yours! Bring me more cake!”

  13. Sontin May 20, 2018 at 9:28 am

    The Weyr’s way of dealing with Jora does bring up an interesting point that I’d never considered before: how do Pernese normally take care of their dead? We know that in Half Circle Hold they’re given a burial at sea, but what happens to the body? Do they just write off that particular boat? Is it reserved for respected people, such as Petiron? Do landbound Pernese use dragons for cremation, or do they bury their dead? Is there such a thing as a Pernese graveyard? Or do they just carry the dead into the nearest forest and leave them there to feed the scavengers?

    Todd McCaffrey sometimes responds to questions on his blog. He’s occasionally pompous and arrogant if one can judge by some of his replies, but this is now bugging me to the point where I might try and get the ‘official’ answer.

  14. genesistrine May 20, 2018 at 1:17 pm

    The most detail we get is Sallah Telgar’s burial in AtWoP, and that’s not much.

    Burial services were usually brief, even for the most honored being. The deeds and goodness of unusual persons were perpetuated in song and harper tales, which were considered the most fitting of memorials.

    So bla bla, unless you’re Harper-approved you’re not going to be memorialized. As for actual burial ceremonies Sallah’s remains get stuck in a handy random cave by the hall:

    “There is that small cave, just to the north of the main court, the one which that recent rockslide revealed. It is just large enough—” She faltered and then recovered. “And certainly accessible, easy to reseal.”

    Though later there’s “Let her rest now with others of the Blood in the Hold that bears her name and honors her above all its ancestors.” Which kind of implies that there are other Telgars buried somewhere around there, but there’s no mention of a mausoleum, or any kind of burial ground. Do they just chip out a niche every time someone dies and shove the body in?

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